January 31, 2022

JAN 31, non-sequitur: efficaciousness






 Our collection of 'Non-Sequiturs' on our parent blog "Edifying Nonsense", contains an admittedly bizarre assortment of nonsensical odds-and-ends, that don't quite fit into other topic-based offerings. But should you want to review the entire collection, click HERE.

January 30, 2022

JAN 30, palinku (poetic novelty): fruits#1,#2

  In this post we will continue with a novel form of poetic wordplay. Inspired by Japanese haiku poetry, this new form is used for a terse verse with a total of 17 syllables displayed on three lines. Unlike its classic Japanese analogue, this concoction does not mandate the precise distribution of the syllables among the three lines, but does stipulate that each word in the poem be included in a palindromic phrase or sentence in English (i.e. one that can be read either forwards or backwards). 

  To help the reader discern the origin of the lyrics, each palindrome (generally occupying one of the three lines of the poem) has been color-coded. 

  And, just in case you have forgotten what palindromes are about, your blogsite hosts have arranged a serial set of brief lessons on the topic ('Political Palindromes'); click HERE



palinku




palinku

 (Ed. note:) Verses of this ilk have continued to accumulate. You can view them all at one swoop if you proceed to our more encyclopedic blog "Edifying Nonsense". Click HERE.


links for any date: scroll over to the calendar-based listings of 'Past Posts' in the righthand column on this page, choose your month of interest, and then select (by clicking) the blogpost of your choice.





January 29, 2022

JAN 29, culinary verse: Santorini wines









 
Find the collection of illustrated poems dealing with these issues on the post 'Culinary Verse' on our full-service blog 'Edifying Nonsense'. Click HERE!

links for any date: scroll over to the calendar-based listings of 'Past Posts' in the righthand column on this page, choose your month of interest, and then select (by clicking) the post of your choice.




January 28, 2022

JAN 28, pathos and poetry (gun control verse): anger and guns







 You can review our entire poetic outpouring on this important topic by proceeding to a post on our full-service blog 'Edifying Nonsense'; click HERE.

January 27, 2022

JAN 27, reprehensible modern history: 'clannishness' negated







 View the entire collection of poetic assertions on this topic (currently small, but growing) at our more encyclopedic blog 'Edifying Nonsense', by clicking HERE.

January 26, 2022

JAN 26, reptiles: amphisbaenians






You can review these illustrated verses in a wider context by proceeding to 'Verses about Reptiles' on the full-service blog 'Edifying Nonsense'.


January 25, 2022

JAN 25, funny bones: hook of the hamate










 You can view verses on this topic in a wider context by proceeding to the post 'Breaking News: FUNNY BONES' on our full-service blog "Edifying Nonsense". Click HERE!


links for any date: scroll over to the calendar-based listings of 'Past Posts' in the righthand column on this page, choose your month of interest, and then select (by clicking) the post of your choice.


January 24, 2022

JAN 24, palinku (poetic novelty): puzzling and magic palindromes

   In this post, we continue with a novel form of poetic wordplay. Inspired by Japanese haiku poetry, this new form is used for a terse verse with a total of 17 syllables displayed on three lines. Unlike its classic Japanese analogue, this concoction does not mandate the precise distribution of the syllables among the three lines, but does stipulate that each word in the poem be included in a palindromic phrase or sentence in English (i.e. one that can be read either forwards or backwards). 

  To help the reader discern the origin of the lyrics, each palindrome (generally occupying one of the three lines of the poem) has been color-coded. The current post should be regarded as experimental; readers are referred to other posts in this collection for a review of the standard format.

   And, just in case you have forgotten what palindromes are about, your blogsite hosts have arranged a serial set of brief lessons on the topic ('Political Palindromes') which you can review by clicking HERE


palinku




palinku


The enhanced second slide shows the poetic content in the form of only two palindromic phrases -- these are both 'magical palindromes'. 

Ed. note:) Verses of this type have otherwise continued to accumulate. You can view them all at one swoop if you proceed with a single click to our more encyclopedic blog "Edifying Nonsense". Click HERE

links for any date: scroll over to the calendar-based listings of 'Past Posts' in the righthand column on this page, choose your month of interest, and then select (by clicking) the post of your choice.


January 23, 2022

JAN 23, wordplay maps: Scramble-towns, 'postal supplements'

Everyone around the planet joins in sending Dr. JJ wishes for a speedy recovery!










You can get into the sequence of earlier wordplay posts on this topic by following these links  .... 

LINKS to other nonsense in this series: 
Back to the previous Canadian map, eh?
Default to U.S.A. map #21 (final American version)

links for any date: scroll over to the calendar-based listings of 'Past Posts' in the righthand column on this page, choose your year and then  your month of interest, and then select (by clicking) the blogpost of your choice.



 

January 22, 2022

JAN 22, bar-fauna: snafus at Fulton's 'Gnu-Bar'








 

If you liked this submission, you might want to refer to our entire collection of verses about human and animal denizens of bars, pubs and other watering-holes. Click HERE.


January 21, 2022

JAN 21, poets' corner: singable limericks




                                                                                       photo courtesy of MMH


January 20, 2022

JAN 20, planet-saving verse: beach foam

 











You can help save the planet by viewing all our verses in this series at "Edifying Nonsense". Click HERE!



January 19, 2022

JAN 19, poetic Panama palindrome parody: Ipanema


 







You can review the whole collection of our illustrated verses on this topic  by proceeding to 'Reversing Verse: Panama palindrome parodies' on the full-service blog 'Edifying Nonsense'.

And, if you are interested in seeing innumerable examples of spoofy palindrome variants on wordplay maps, you could embark on a journey through a collection of  blogposts entitled 'Tourists' Palindromic Guides: The Americas, #1 -#4'. All that's needed is to click on the link.



January 18, 2022

JAN 18, mammalian wildlife: kri-kri (Cretan goat)









 You can review the whole collection of illustrated verses about mammals (both domestic and exotic) by checking out the more extensive post on our full-service blog "Edifying Nonsense". Click HERE !

links for any date: scroll over to the calendar-based listings of 'Past Posts' in the righthand column on this page, choose your year and month of interest, and then select (by clicking) the post of your choice.

January 17, 2022

JAN 17, dental feelings: implants







You can review the collection of illustrated verses on this topic by proceeding to the post 'Dental Feelingson our full-service blog 'Edifying Nonsense'.


links for any date: scroll over to the calendar-based listings of 'Past Posts' in the righthand column on this page, choose your month of interest, and then select (by clicking) the post of your choice. 

January 16, 2022

JAN 16, exotic destination: Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina





Other verses about 'Exotic Travel Destinations' can be found on our blog 'Edifying Nonsense'. Click HERE.





shoreline of Charleston Harbor,
cruiseship approaching in shipping lane




approachable 'wild' waterfowl,
an attraction at the Shem Creek boardwalk



January 15, 2022

JAN 15, waterfowl: juvenile night herons

 


              

You can review these illustrated verses in a wider context by proceeding to 'Immersible Verse: Limericks about Waterfowl' on the full-service blog 'Edifying Nonsense'. (Or, if you prefer, you can view them on Facebook in Giorgio's photo-albums).




January 14, 2022

JAN 14, palinku (poetic novelty): family life

  In this post, we will continue with a novel form of poetic wordplay. Inspired by Japanese haiku poetry, this new form is used for a terse verse with a total of 17 syllables displayed on three lines. Unlike its classic Japanese analogue, this concoction does not mandate the precise distribution of the syllables among the three lines, but does stipulate that each word in the poem be included in a palindromic phrase or sentence in English (i.e. one that can be read either forwards or backwards). 

  To help the reader discern the origin of the lyrics, each palindrome (generally occupying one of the three lines of the poem) has been color-coded. 

  And, just in case you have forgotten what palindromes are about, your blogsite hosts have arranged a serial set of brief lessons on the topic ('Political Palindromes'); click HERE




 
(Ed. note:) Verses of this unique type have continued to accumulate. You can view them all at one swoop if you  proceed with a single click to our more encyclopedic blog "Edifying Nonsense". Click HERE.


links for any date: scroll over to the calendar-based listings of 'Past Posts' in the righthand column on this page, and select (by clicking) the week of your choice.

 


January 13, 2022

JAN 13, limericks for lovers of classic languages: yukky Roman foods

 



To review all of our output on the topic of classic languages, go to our encyclopedic compendium, "Edifying Nonsense"; click HERE !

links for any date: scroll over to the calendar-based listings of 'Past Posts' in the righthand column on this page, and select (by clicking) the month and then the specific post of your choice.

January 12, 2022

JAN 12, patients and maladies: septic shock









 You can view these verses in a wider context by proceeding to 'Nurse-Verse: Patients and their Maladies' on our full-service blog "Edifying Nonsense". Click HERE!


January 11, 2022

JAN 11, doctors and their practices: waiting-room journal 'Stitches'

Happy palindromic birthday to D.A.!







You can view additional informative verses on this topic  by proceeding to the collection 'DOCTORS and their PRACTICES' on our full-service blog "Edifying Nonsense". Click HERE! 


links for any date: scroll over to the calendar-based listings of 'Past Posts' in the righthand column on this page, choose your month of interest, and then select (by clicking) the post of your choice.

to continue daily titillationsBE SURE TO BOOKMARK THIS SITE! 

January 10, 2022

JAN 10, garden intruders: papyrus









 
Readers, you are fortunate to have available all our poetic comments on creatures (animal and vegetable), devoted to subverting your gardening plans. To view this collection on our full-service blog "Edifying Nonsense", click HERE!


You can also review illustrated verses about orderly garden inhabitants by proceeding to 'Poetry Praising the Charleston Garden' on the full-service blog 'Edifying Nonsense'. Click HERE! (or if you prefer, you can view them on Facebook in Giorgio's photo-albums.)






January 9, 2022

JAN 9, curtained verse: medieval challenge

 EDITORS' WARNING: You must be at least 12 years of age to read this post! 






 

You can review other mildly scurrilous illustrated verses in a wider context by proceeding to 'Curtained verse: Faintly Obscene (Selected) Limericks' on the full-service blog 'Edifying Nonsense'.



January 8, 2022

JAN 8, palinku (poetic novelty): pets

  In this post, we will continue with a novel form of poetic wordplay. Inspired by Japanese haiku poetry, this new form is used for a terse verse with a total of 17 syllables displayed on three lines. Unlike its classic Japanese analogue, this concoction does not mandate the precise distribution of the syllables among the three lines, but does stipulate that each word in the poem be included in a palindromic phrase or sentence in English (i.e. one that can be read either forwards or backwards). 

  To help the reader discern the origin of the lyrics, each palindrome (generally occupying one of the three lines of the poem) has been color-coded.

  And, just in case you have forgotten what palindromes are about, your blogsite hosts have arranged a serial set of brief lessons on the topic ('Political Palindromes') which you can review by clicking HERE

 


 
A limerick dealing with pets and vets can be found HERE.

(Ed. note:) Terse 'palinku' verses like today's offering have continued to accumulate. You can view them all at one swoop if you  proceed with a single click to our more encyclopedic blog "Edifying Nonsense". Click HERE ! (or if you prefer, you can view them on Facebook in Giorgio's photo-albums.)