November 30, 2021

NOV 30: binomial phrases: fixed order









 To review the poetic effusion that we have accumulated about binomial phrases, proceed to our blog "Edifying Nonsense", and look over the post  'Grandpa Greg's Grammar: Binomial Expressions'. Click HERE ! (Or, if you prefer, you could look over this stuff on Giorgio's Facebook photo-albums.) 

There is also an entire collection of lyrics to patter songs, somewhat older material, dedicated to various kinds of binomials, that provides more didactic material and an extensive series of examples, and allows you to sing these expressions for your own enjoyment, or for that of others around you. Click HERE !




November 29, 2021

NOV 29, poetic Panama palindrome parody: 'Pan's panama hat'









You can review the whole collection of our illustrated verses on this topic  by proceeding to 'Reversing Verse: Panama palindrome parodies' on the full-service blog 'Edifying Nonsense'.


And, if you are interested in seeing innumerable examples of spoofy palindrome variants on wordplay maps, you could embark on a journey through a collection of  blogposts entitled 'Tourists' Palindromic Guides: The Americas, #1 -#4'. All that's needed is to click on the link.



November 28, 2021

NOV 28, American satire: laying blame




 The author reveals thgat he was influenced in this formulation by TV interviews given by his niece, the clinical psychologist Mary Trump.

 We hope that you enjoyed this verse. You can find 30 more on this topic in 5 collections on our full-service blog 'Edifying Nonsense'. Click HERE to start! 

November 27, 2021

NOV 27, palinku (poetic novelty): politics


  In this post, we will continue with a novel form of poetic wordplay. Inspired by Japanese haiku poetry, this new form is used for a terse verse with a total of 17 syllables displayed on three lines. Unlike its classic Japanese analogue, this concoction does not mandate the precise distribution of the syllables among the three lines, but does stipulate that each word in the poem be included in a palindromic phrase or sentence in English (i.e. one that can be read either forwards or backwards). 

  To help the reader discern the origin of the lyrics, each palindrome (generally occupying one of the three lines of the poem) has been color-coded. 




(Ed. note:) Verses of this type have continued to accumulate, and there are now more than 50 of them. You can easily view them all  if you  proceed  to our more encyclopedic blog "Edifying Nonsense". Click HERE.

(Or, if your prefer, you can view all this material on Facebook  in Giorgio's photo-albums.)


Also, if you enjoy the concept of political palindromes, you can review how they are constructed, and see a slew of examples, by undertaking an adventure-journey of bidirectional blogposts entitled 'Political Palindromes'. Click HERE to start. 


November 26, 2021

NOV 26, death and the afterlife: Tithonus and immortality






 You can review more poems about 'Death and the Afterlife' in context on our full-service blog 'Edifying Nonsense'. Click HERE!


November 25, 2021

NOV 25, a brief saga: the domestic turkey

HAPPY AMERICAN THANKSGIVING!
















  For the purpose of this blog, a 'brief saga' is defined as a poem, usually narrative, but occasionally expository, that tell its story in at least 15 lines. Most commonly, the format involves three stanzas in limerick form, constituting a single submission to the online humor site 'Omnificent English Dictionary iLimerick Form'. On the OEDILF site, rigorous standards for content and format are involved in a collaborative editing process that may take several weeks to over a year. 

  Generally, OEDILF has not been enormously welcoming of multi-verse submissions, but Giorgio Coniglio has persisted, and the OEDILF number for each accepted multiverse poem is shown here on the slide with its first verse. 

To access the next 'brief saga' on this blog, proceed to... 'avian digestion'. 
To access the most recent previous 'brief saga', back up to 'Dodecanese Islands'.
If you were intrigued by the dual rhyming scheme exhibited in the first stanza of the above poem, you might want to look at our entire collection (a dozen or so other verses) of such 'bi-lyrical verse' by clicking HERE



November 24, 2021

NOV 24, birdlore: desnooding turkeys (role of the mohel)








You can view an encyclopedic collection of illustrated poems on this topic by proceeding to the post 'Poems about BIRDLIFE' on our full-service blog "Edifying Nonsense". Click HERE.




November 23, 2021

NOV 23, waterfowl: trumpeter swans

 


















 You can review these illustrated verses in a wider context by proceeding to 'Immersible Verse: Limericks about Waterfowl' on the full-service blog 'Edifying Nonsense'. (Or, if you prefer, you can view them on Facebook in Giorgio's photo-albums).



November 22, 2021

NOV 22, life in palindrome Valley: palindrome bees







You can review other illustrated verses on this topic by proceeding to the collection 'Life in Palindrome Valley' on our full-service blog 'Edifying Nonsense'.



November 21, 2021

NOV 21, patients and maladies: beware, boomers!





This verse can be considered a companion to the verse benign tumors.

 You can view all such verses in a wider context by proceeding to 'Nurse-Verse: Patients and their Maladies' on our full-service blog "Edifying Nonsense". Click HERE!


November 20, 2021

NOV 20, wordplay maps: Scramble-towns of eastern Canada, #15 and #16


Who would ever have guessed? It turns out that an unparalleled word in generating anagrams, i.e. letter scrambles, is P-A-L-I-N-D-R-O-M-E-S. We have taken advantage of that property to create this unique series of wordplay maps of imaginary American (and Canadian) locales, each one completed by its official two-letter state (or provincial) abbreviation. 




 LINKS to other nonsense in this series: 

Forward to the next Canadian map, eh?
Back to the previous Canadian map, eh?
Default to U.S.A. map #21 (final American version)







 LINKS to other nonsense in this series: 

Forward? See the finale of this entire continental series.
Back to the previous Canadian map, eh?
Default to U.S.A. map #21 (final American version)






November 19, 2021

NOV 19, bar-fauna: the 'mule', a mixed drink

 







 (Ed. note) The photo embedded in the first slide shows Giorgio on Santorini in 2017; incidentally Giorgio's favorite mixed drink is the 'mule', 'Moscow' with vodka as the liquor, 'southern' using bourbon, or non-alcoholic. Ouzo might work, but that remains an untested hypothesis.


 If you liked this submission, you might want to refer to our entire collection of verses about human and animal denizens of bars, pubs and other watering-holes. Click HERE.


November 18, 2021

NOV 18, non-sequitur: beaver tales ("Gone with the Wind")







 

Our collection of 'Non-Sequiturs' on our parent blog "Edifying Nonsense", contains an admittedly bizarre assortment of nonsensical odds-and-ends, that don't quite fit into other topic-based offerings. But should you want to review the entire collection, click HERE.
 

November 17, 2021

NOV 17, planet-saving verse: 'too hot to hoot' - palindrome














You can help save the planet by viewing all our verses in this series at "Edifying Nonsense". Click HERE!


November 16, 2021

NOV 16, mammalian wildlife: Western lowland gorillas







 

You can review a whole collection of illustrated verses about mammals (both domestic and exotic) by checking out the more extensive post on our full-service blog "Edifying Nonsense". Click HERE !

November 15, 2021

NOV 15, humorists' scurrilous talk: 'comings and goings'

EDITORS' WARNING: You must be at least 12 years of age to read this post! 




The collection of informative verses dealing with 'HUMORISTS' SCURRILOUS TALK' can be found by proceeding to our full-service blog "Edifying Nonsense". Click HERE!


November 14, 2021

NOV 14, bottom line of medical humor: proctology





You can view these informative verses in a wider context by proceeding to the collection 'The BOTTOM LINE of MEDICAL HUMOR' on our full-service blog "Edifying Nonsense". Click HERE!


November 13, 2021

NOV 13, wordplay maps: Scramble-towns of eastern Canada, #13 and #14



Who would ever have guessed? It turns out that an unparalleled word in generating anagrams, i.e. letter scrambles, is P-A-L-I-N-D-R-O-M-E-S. We have taken advantage of that property to create this unique series of wordplay maps of imaginary American (and Canadian) locales, each one completed by its official two-letter state (or provincial) abbreviation. 




LINKS to other nonsense in this series: 

Forward to the next Canadian map, eh?
Back to the previous Canadian map, eh?
Default to U.S.A. map #21 (final American version)




 LINKS to other nonsense in this series: 

Forward to the next Canadian map, eh?
Back to the previous Canadian map, eh?
Default to U.S.A. map #21 (final American version)



November 12, 2021

NOV 12, etymology: 'mystery'




For fans of etymology, we have three blogposts with collections of verses about word-origins such as the one above on our more encyclopedic blog "Edifying Nonsense". You can start to review some of this intriguing material by clicking HERE, and then following the links!



November 11, 2021

NOV 11, insects: woolly bear caterpillars









You can review Giorgio's other verses about pesty and occasionally beneficial insects, as  collected in 'Buzzwords: Verses about Insects' on the full-service blog "Edifying Nonsense". Click HERE.


November 10, 2021

NOV 10, palinku (poetic novelty): Kansas (KS)


 In this post, we will continue with a novel form of poetic wordplay. Inspired by Japanese haiku poetry, this new form is used for a terse verse with a total of 17 syllables displayed on three lines. Unlike its classic Japanese analogue, this concoction does not mandate the precise distribution of the syllables among the three lines, but does stipulate that each word in the poem be included in a palindromic phrase or sentence in English (i.e. one that can be read either forwards or backwards). 

  To help the reader discern the origin of the lyrics, each palindrome (generally occupying one of the three lines of the poem) has been color-coded. 

 And, just in case you have forgotten what palindromes are about, your blogsite hosts have arranged a serial set of brief lessons on the topic ('Political Palindromes'); start by clicking HERE





 
 (Ed. note:) Verses of this ilk have continued to accumulate. You can view them all at one swoop if you  proceed with a single click to our more encyclopedic blog "Edifying Nonsense". Click HERE.




November 9, 2021

NOV 9, magical palindromes: 'Pa's as selfless as I am'





 

You can become an expert fan of our wordplay concoction 'magical palindromes' by reviewing the explanatory material found in ancient days on our full-service blog "Edifying NonsenseHERE.




November 8, 2021

NOV 8, domestic hazards: ionization-based smoke detectors







 


 You can view an extensive collection of illustrated poems on this topic by proceeding to the post 'DOMESTIC HAZARDS' on our full-service blog "Edifying Nonsense". Click HERE.



November 7, 2021

NOV 7, reptiles: autotomy







 You can review photos and illustrated herpetologic verses in a wider context by proceeding to 'Verses about Reptiles (don't worry! no snakes)' on the full-service blog "Edifying Nonsense".

November 6, 2021

NOV 6, exotic destination: Swampland

 








Other verses about 'Exotic Travel Destinations' can be found on our blog 'Edifying Nonsense'. Click HERE.