June 4, 2024

JUN 4, national verse: Armenia

reprise from June 2020

JUN 4, national and multinational verse: Armenia




Authors' Note:

neurasthenia: obsolete term from psychiatry, implying general debility attributed to exhaustion of the nervous system

Armenia, the first country in the world to adopt Christianity, has had disputes with its neighbors for most of its existence. The revered Mt. Ararat is now located geopolitically in Turkey, but is still considered a national symbol of Armenia, and dominates the view from the Armenian capital of Yerevan. Armenia's borders to the east and west currently remain closed owing to hostile relations with Azerbaijan and Turkey.


You can review our collection of verses about various individual nations, and about the groupings to which they belong, on our topic-based blog "Edifying Nonsense". Click HERE.




 

June 3, 2024

JUN 3, poetic non-sequitur: the problem of scansion

 

reprise from Jun 2020








You can find lots of other verses on this blog under the listing "Poets' Corner".  Click HERE.



June 2, 2024

JUN 2, American satire (prolongation): honest

 


HONEST

"What I'm saying is God's honest truth,"

Per accused perp, now long in the tooth.

With the court now in session,

We'll assess his expression,

As conveyed from the media booth.

Author's Note: In 2023, the US is looking forward to televized trials of certain national figures. One hopes that each member of the public can easily cut through the veneer of righteousness conveyed by persons whose careers have been built on longstanding deception.

We hope that you enjoyed this verse. You can find 40 more on this topic in 6 collections on our full-service blog 'Edifying Nonsense'. Click HERE to start! 

June 1, 2024

JUN 1, American satire: Sharpie-gate

 

reprise from June 2020

JUN 1, American satire: Sharpie-gate (hurricane season reminiscence)

Keep more to yourself for a while, wash your hands frequently, wear a mask in public, remember to laugh on occasion, and stay well!

Here's a relevant recollection, given that June 1 is the official start of the Atlantic hurricane season.






We hope that you enjoyed this verse. You can find 40 more on this topic in 5 collections on our full-service blog 'Edifying Nonsense'. Click HERE to start! 



May 31, 2024

MAY 31, ambulatory verse: slink




 You can review all our verses on this topic, accumulated for you on our companion blog "Edifying Nonsense", by clicking HERE.


May 30, 2024

MAY 30 (2024), singable satire: Harry Belafonte sings "ISLAND IN THE SUN" (Iceland)

 PARODY-LYRICS

ORIGINAL SONG "Island In the Sun", Harry Belafonte 1957. The original song has been covered in versions in German and Swedish, but not as far as I can tell in Icelandic. 
PARODY COMPOSED: Giorgio Coniglio, December 2015.

PARODY-SONGLINK: To find ukulele chord-charts to help you accompany "Iceland in the Sun" on your favorite instrument, click HERE.

This song resulted from a family trip to Iceland in June 2015. Our few days there were packed with wonderful sightseeing excursions. The weather was as good as it gets in Iceland (only minimal rain, not interfering with our travels). The highlight of the trip was the recently opened IceCave excursion; after a palpitating ride by giant truck over a huge ice-field, we walked into a system of tunnels in the glacier itself, led by an excellent informative guide.
The Icelandic language, a venerable tongue which has apparently changed little since the first settlers came to the island in the 9th century, seems challenging to learn. Fortunately for us, the friendly locals we encountered, at least in Reykjavik, all spoke English quite well.

Ísland = Iceland , pronounced eess-lant
ðan daginn = good morning, hello, pronounced goh-than die-in.
Eyjafjallajökull (j's pronounced as y)  = Island-Mountain-icecap, the subglacial volcano whose brief eruption caused the Icelandic ash problem in 2010; the volcano has now been considered dormant for 5 years.
    






ÍSLAND (Iceland) IN THE SUN

(to the tune of Belafonte's "Island in The Sun")

This year we flew with Icelandair
Europe-bound and stopped halfway there.
We left TO, our kids from DC,
A meet-up trip for our family. 

Oh, Ísland, land of sun
Nights stay bright for the month of June;
Four full days, awesome sights to praise
Geysers, glaciers, volcanoes
IceCave, Langjökull
And Blue Lagoon.

A neat idea, break our trip
Meet at hotel-suite in Reykjavik.
Restos coped with vegg-necessity
And one kid GF lactose-free.

Didn’t know, but they’re eco-smart
Geo-thermal at system’s heart
Hot water piped everywhere you see
Heat all home and greenhouse for free.

Oh, Ísland, northern light
Eyjafjallajökull
eruption March 2010
Four full days touring awesome sights
Hotel choose, or your sleep you’ll lose
Weekends downtown bars
Never close at night.

Recent attraction, not to skip
Monster truck, glacier Ice-Cave trip
Bundle up, walk though colored ice
View crevasse, bottom-up is nice. 

Oh, Ísland, isle of fun
Nights stay bright for the month of June
Four full days, awesome sights to praise
Glacier overlying
 dormant volcano, 2013
Close with steamy bathing
At Blue Lagoon.

I'll greet old friends - ðan daginn”, soon
When we go back some year in June
Next time stay longer, get my fill - 
Climb, and say, “Eyjafjallajökull”.

Oh, Ísland, isle of sun
Nights stay bright for the month of June;
More full days, awesome sights to praise
Geysers, glaciers, volcanoes
And Blue Lagoon.


tourist-party atop the glacier
 'night'-time hike down volcano
 to a steamy bathing spot







May 29, 2024

MAY 29, submitted palindromes, targeted: "EMBARGOS SO GRAB ME."



 

For word nerds like us, who adore palindromes, hours of delight await  on our blog "Edifying Nonsense".

First of all, there  is a series of posts, on the 25th of each month (2020 through 2024) featuring collections of "submitted palindromes", attributable to the contributing authors shown above, constituting a loosely organized compendium of intriguing back and forth phrases; frequently, these are inspired by the "classic" palindrome repertoire, as is the case in today's offering as shown in the above slide.

Then, on the 20th of each month, original topic-based collections of wordplay items are displayed, often as "wordplay maps". These include anagrams and other forms of wordplay in addition to palindromes. However, the latter lexical device is honored in major outpourings including "New World Palindromes", "Old World Palindromes", "Magical Palindromes" and even a post on "The Meaning of Life as Revealed in Palindromes". 

The first three posts of each month on "Edifying Nonsense", (on the 5th, 10th and 15th), are the repository of short poetic verses, mostly limericks and "limerrhoids",  the majority of which have gone through rigorous collaborative editing on an online site. But even there, wordplay, particularly palindromes, are honored and discussed. So you can, by following the links, find some five collections (with eight verses each),  dealing with the "Classic Palindrome Repertoire", not to mention  extensions displaying terse verses about the fabled "Palindrome Valley" and parodies about the "Panama Canal". 

And, even further, there is under construction a group of parody-songs honoring the classic palindromes. The song lyrics will be posted here, on this blog ("Daily Illustrated Nonsense") and also, with more musical direction on "Silly Songs and Satire."  We will update you when that project has been completed, but if you insist, you could sneak an advance peak at the song "Sin and Redemption".  

May 28, 2024

MAY 28, birdlore: cedar waxwings

a)  reprise from May 2020: 


MAY 25, birdlore: cedar waxwings







b)  season's farewell to South Carolina

fiddler crab



May 27, 2024

MAY 27, exotic destination: Cappadocia, Turkey


a) reprise from 2020

MAY 28, 2020: exotic destination: Cappadocia (troglodytes)





Other verses about 'Exotic Travel Destinations' can be found on our blog 'Edifying Nonsense'. Click HERE.

 

b) incidental current photo

A sad but determined bumblebee, having lost its left wings, likely in an altercation with some physical object (building?), makes its way on foot across a stone patio.  




May 26, 2024

MAY 26, defining opinion: hoarding (construction)




 
Our blogpost "Defining Opinion" on the topic-based blog "Edifying Nonsense" shows a selection of similar verses submitted to OEDILF (the online Omnificent English Dictionary iLimerick Form). You can see all of these on one visit by clicking HERE.

May 25, 2024

MAY 25, pill-poppin verse: Fentanyl addiction


 Authors' Note: 
Everything you might want to know about fentanyl can be found in a verse at OEDILF by DavidGries. Click HERE.



May 24, 2024

MAY 24, etymology: havoc / haven

 a) reprise from May 2020

MAY 29, etymology: 'havoc'/'haven'












For fans of etymology, we have three blogposts with collections of verses about word-origins such as the one above on our more encyclopedic blog "Edifying Nonsense". You can start to review some of this intriguing material by clicking HERE, and then following the links!

b) incidental photo







May 23, 2024

MAY 23, photocollage: Lishman's sculptures

Bill Lishman's sculpture displayed at Tanenbaum Sculpture Garden, Bridgepoint Health, Toronto, is described by blogTO as "one of Toronto's best-kept art secrets". 
Note that Lishman, the inventor-aviator-naturalist father portrayed in the close-to-real-life story of the 1996 film "Fly Away Home", was a polymath who took up sculpting rather late in life.








TO SEE MORE STUFF: To see older or newer material  (posted daily, or at least on most  'good' days), CLICK below the Comments Section, on 'Older Post' or 'Newer Post'.

May 21, 2024

MAY 21, geysers: geyser guru

reprise from May 2020

MAY 21, geysers: geyser guru



Authors' Note:  The geyser (GHIE-zer or GHEE-ser) is an unusual hydrogeologic phenomenon which occurs in volcanic zones where magma (molten lava) is close to the surface, and there is fissuring of rocks due to earthquake faults. Minerals dissolved from adjacent rocks precipitate out, forming a lining for a type of 'plumbing system' in which steam builds up, resulting in regular eruptions of boiling water. Changes in the colour of the swirling hot water in the pool help predict the arrival of the next photogenic discharge. 

 Yellowstone Park, in the American Rockies, is a site of these natural wonders, including the famous geyser ‘Old Faithful’.

b)

  

May 20, 2024

MAY 20, submitted palindromes, targeted: "LISA BONET ATE NO BASIL"




 For word nerds like us, who adore palindromes, hours of delight await  on our blog "Edifying Nonsense".

First of all, there  is a series of posts, on the 25th of each month (2020 through 2024) featuring collections of "submitted palindromes", attributable to the contributing authors shown above, constituting a loosely organized compendium of intriguing back and forth phrases; frequently, these are inspired by the "classic" palindrome repertoire, as is the case in today's offering as shown in the above slide.

Then, on the 20th of each month, original topic-based collections of wordplay items are displayed, often as "wordplay maps". These include anagrams and other forms of wordplay in addition to palindromes. However, the latter lexical device is honored in major outpourings including "New World Palindromes", "Old World Palindromes", "Magical Palindromes" and even a post on "The Meaning of Life as Revealed in Palindromes". 

The first three posts of each month on "Edifying Nonsense", (on the 5th, 10th and 15th), are the repository of short poetic verses, mostly limericks and "limerrhoids",  the majority of which have gone through rigorous collaborative editing on an online site. But even there, wordplay, particularly palindromes, are honored and discussed. So you can, by following the links, find some five collections (with eight verses each),  dealing  with the "Classic Palindrome Repertoire", not to mention  extensions displaying terse verses about the fabled "Palindrome Valley" and parodies about the "Panama Canal". 

And, even further, there is under construction a group of parody-songs honoring the classic palindromes. The song lyrics will be posted here, on this blog ("Daily Illustrated Nonsense") and also, with more musical direction on "Silly Songs and Satire."  We will update you when that project has been completed, but if you insist, you could sneak an advance peak at the song "Sin and Redemption".  

May 19, 2024

MAY 19, poetic non-sequitur: almost kosher fare

 

Authors' Note: 

fress: a Yiddish loanword for eating with vigor, whole-heartedly, as explained HERE

treif (TRAYF): Yiddish for foods expressly prohibited under the laws of Kahshrut, including pork and shellfish

kasher: synonym used in Israel and Sephardic venues elsewhere for the Ashkenazi word kosher; the regulations involving foodstuff are quite complex, and in addition to the prohibitions mandate separation of particular allowed sources, e.g. meat and dairy; kashery (noun and adjective) is the author's personal neologism.

It is suggested that those concerned about a particular eatery should consult  their spiritual advisor. 

Our collection of 'Non-Sequiturs' on our parent blog "Edifying Nonsense", contains an unusual assortment of odds-and-ends, that don't quite fit into other topic-based offerings. But should you want to review the entire collection, click HERE.

May 18, 2024

MAY 18, postal places, USA: Fargo, ND





Authors' Note: ND is the official abbreviation for the American state of North Dakota, whose largest city is Fargo with a population of 126,000. Located on the floodplain of the Red River, the city was named after William Fargo, director of the Northern Pacific Railway and honcho of Wells Fargo Express.


 At one swell foop, you can review all our postal poems about intriguing places in the USA and Canada, by proceeding to the encyclopedic blog "Edifying Nonsense". Click HERE !

May 17, 2024

MAY 17, palinku (poetic novelty): denial #3

  In this post, we continue with our novel form of poetic wordplay. 

  Inspired by Japanese haiku poetry, the "palinku" is a terse verse with a total of 17 syllables displayed on three lines. Unlike its earlier English-language forerunners, this concoction does not mandate the precise distribution of the syllables among the three lines, but does stipulate that each word in the poem be included in a palindromic phrase or sentence  (i.e. one that can be read either forwards or backwards). 

  To help the reader discern the origin of the lyrics, each palindrome, generally occupying one of the three lines of the poem, has been color-coded. Readers will note that we have been publishing verses of this type on the 17th of each month.











 You can readily view all our verses of this type if you proceed with a single click to our more encyclopedic blog "Edifying Nonsense". Click HERE. (Or if you prefer, you can stay on this particular blogsite and look for the offerings for the 17th day of each month -- there are now more than 60 of these.)




May 16, 2024

MAY 16, poetic non-sequitur: horticultural



Author's Note: 

arrangement of florists: proposed collective noun for this occupational grouping


Our collection of "Non-Sequiturs" on our parent blog "Edifying Nonsense", contains an admittedly bizarre assortment of nonsensical odds-and-ends, that don't quite fit into other topic-based offerings. But should you want to review the entire collection, click HERE.




May 15, 2024

MAY 15, Carolina lowcountry: quiet day


 reprise from May 2020


 MAY 15, Carolina lowcountry: a quiet day's photocollage.